Chronicling My Media Consumption: Vol. 2

Long Things

How Mark Zuckerberg Led Facebook’s War to Crush Google Plus (Vanity Fair Hive)
Earlier this month, Vanity Fair launched a “new mobile-first site devoted to Wall Street, Washington, and Silicon Valley.” As you’d expect, it’s full of articles that give an inside look behind closed doors or their best guess at what’s happening. This piece in particular shines when it describes Facebook’s work culture and lets you see what it’s like to be a part of their world.

Ripple Effect (Wired)
About two weeks ago, I received an email from the DC Public Library system notifying me that seven drinking water sources in libraries throughout the city have high levels of lead. I soon read this article, which follows water engineer Marc Edwards and his quest to protect our water supply from dangerous substances. It’s a sobering reminder that safe drinking water is not something that can be taken for granted.

Choosing a School for My Daughter in a Segregated City (New York Times)
My first introduction to school segregation in a present-day context came from This American Life. I’ve always imagined segregation to be a long-abolished relic from the Jim Crow era, but lots of articles like this one have proven me wrong.

Ethics and the Eye of the Beholder (BuzzFeed)
There is a particularly poignant irony in knowing that a philosopher who is celebrated for his stance on ethics fails to applies these same principles to his personal life.

Fandom Is Broken (Birth. Movies. Death.)
Ghostbusters, Frozen, and the Strange Entitlement of Fan Culture (AV Club)
Is the customer always right? Both pieces say no and that the intense sense of ownership that some fans feel about their favorite works do more harm than good.

The Good News at The Washington Post (New York Magazine)
These days, it sounds like everyone wants to be a media company, especially one armed with buzzwords and innnovation (ahem, TRONC). The Washington Post is no exception, but while it has embraced alluring, click-bait headlines, it’s also trying to figure out how to be a sustainable news organization and adapt to an audience glued to its smartphones. I really like learning about the history of publications, and this article offers a look at how one institution confronting change and using the considerable resources of Amazon founder Jeff Bezos to its advantage.

New York City, No Filter: On Voyeurism, Social Media, and Life in the City (Brooklyn Magazine)
This lovely piece explores our collective fascination with the quotidian. Plus, anyone who can eloquently explain the appeal of Snapchat earns lots of points in my book.

Mother, Writer, Monster, Maid (Vela)
Is there a conflict between being an artist and a mother? For this author, this is not quite the right answer to ask. In this essay, she eloquently reframes the debate with the following assertion: “The conflict is between the selfishness of the artist and the selflessness of a mother.”

The State of the Domestic Goddess (Serious Eats)
This piece reviews cookbooks from Gwyneth Paltrow and Chrissy Teigan. In doing so, Emily Gould carefully analyzes what exactly each so-called domestic goddess is trying to sell their readers.

On Swarm (Gawker)
A confession: I was never a regular reader of Gawker and probably never will be, but I was intrigued by this essay. It presents a fairly interesting ideas about that type of fake civility and moral high ground that people use to defend themselves in arguments, but it can be a little petty and unnecessarily confrontational. It’s also very long, possibly too long.

Continue reading “Chronicling My Media Consumption: Vol. 2”

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